“A Personal Story about Breast Cancer”

Thankfully, my direct family hasn’t been touched by this cancer…touch wood.  I do have a personal story from when I was young though, and it’s stuck with me (and always will).

I was about nine or ten when my best friend in primary school told me her mum had been diagnosed with breast cancer.  I was too young to fully comprehend what this meant.  I knew she’d get sick, of course, and I knew cancer was bad, but that was about it.  I’d often go over to their house, and I watched her get sicker, and her hair fell out.  I knew that was what happened with cancer.  She was always such a happy lady…other than no hair and looking tired, you’d never know she was sick.  She always had a smile on her face and was always happy to have me over.

Things got better.  I didn’t know the specifics because nobody wanted to tell kids that kind of stuff, and kids don’t talk about it with each other, but looking back I believe she must have gone into remission for a little while.  Her hair started growing back, she started getting her strength back, everything started going back to normal.

A year or two later (roughly, I’m not 100% sure), my best friend once again told me her mum had cancer.  Although a little older now, I was still fairly naive to what this could mean.  Oh, don’t get me wrong, I knew cancer could kill people.  I just could never imagine the world without her.  She was too full of life, too happy.  No, she’d get past this too.  She had to.

I remember when my best friend told me her mum had to have her breast removed.  I’d never realized that was one of the treatment options.  I’d always heard people having chemotherapy, it just kind of went hand-in-hand…and I knew sometimes they cut the cancer out.  I just didn’t think they’d remove whole body parts because of it.  It kind of rocked my world a little bit.  Nevertheless, my best friend’s mum kept her chin up.  She’d gone through major surgery and she was still smiling.  It can’t be that bad, I wrongly assumed.  She started losing her hair again.  She started looking tired, weaker.  Then she went back into hospital.

“They’re saying she isn’t going to come back out.” My friend had told me.  What?  I thought.  No.  No, they must have it wrong.  How could that be right?  I remember wholeheartedly believing the doctors were wrong.  There’s no way she’s not going to make it.  She’s too friendly.  Too kind.  Too smiley.  Her personality is too big.  It’s not possible.  She stayed in hospital for some time.  Two weeks, three.  I’m not sure exactly.

I wanted to be there for my friend.  I wanted to go over to her house, keep her company, help her through it.  My mum told me “no, it’s best to leave her to have family time”.  I remember it clear as day.  Now, my mum is usually good with advice (as I’ve come to realize), but in this instance, she was wrong.  I should never have left my friend to have “family time”.  Not like I did.  We began drifting apart, and I’m sure I’m completely to blame.  She became closer with one of our other friends…a friend that was there for her when I wasn’t.  I still to this day wish I’d never listened to my mum.  I feel terrible I was so distant.  It wasn’t my intention, in fact, it was the opposite of my intention.  I’d never been through anything even remotely like what my friend was going through, so I didn’t know what was expected.  I didn’t know what she needed.  All I could do was listen to the (poor) advice I was given.  It still doesn’t make me feel any less guilty.  I’m so sorry.

Anyway, I got a call from my friend’s new best friend, saying that she’d passed on.  I remember it vividly.  I was crying before the phone call had ended.  I went and told mum and she broke down too.  How could this happen?  How could this be real?  How could she just be gone?

We went to the funeral.  I’d only been to one other funeral in my life, a few years before, but that was for my 97-year-old great-grandpa, who had been in a nursing home for a long time and was suffering terribly from dementia.  This was totally different, and a lot sadder.  Plus, I was a bit older, so I guess I knew what was going on more than the previous one.  I remember the drive home, and still being a bit shellshocked about it all.

Part of me still can’t believe she’s gone…and that she’s been gone for so long.  It was my first taste of what cancer can do.  It has no mercy.  It comes back when you think it’s gone.  It choses it’s victims at random.  It doesn’t matter how strong and bubbly and loved someone is, they can still be lost to it.

Rest Easy, Lynne.  We all still think of you and miss you.

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This prompt, and many more, can be found here.

“When Did You First Realise You Were a Writer?”

I don’t really remember when I first knew…I just always sort of have been.  I remember writing stories and drawing pictures for them when I was really little, and getting mum to print them out and I’d show my grandparents.  I remember one in particular was about two aliens.  I wish I had of kept it.

I guess writing just went hand-in-hand with my reading habits.  I was an extremely avid reader as a child.  I’d average between 2-3 books a week when I was about ten.  I’d borrow dozens of books from the library at a time.  When I wasn’t reading, I was writing, or imagining stories and drawing pictures.  I loved creating little worlds and characters and back stories.

As I entered high school, my reading habits died off a little bit, replaced with socialising and playing computer games.  With it also went my writing.  I enjoyed English classes and always excelled in them, but that was about the only writing I did, save for the occasional first chapter of a story I’d start then never go back to.  In year 10, I started writing poetry and songs as I tried to get back into it.  At the time I thought they were pretty good, but I’ve since looked back on them and they weren’t at all.

I’ve also dabbled in blogging on and off since I was about 16, first starting on MySpace, then Facebook, then on various other sites.  I never stuck with it all that long.  That’s my issue.  I get creative urges and then it goes away and I lose interest.  I think this blog is different because I am writing whatever I feel like, whenever I feel like, and I’m not linking it to my social media accounts, so I have an anonymity and a freedom that my previous blogs never did.  It makes things easier as I don’t feel like I need to sensor what I write or worry about what anyone is thinking.

I’d still love to write properly one day.  I think I’d be pretty good at it.  I just never know what to start, and I’m worried I’d start and lose interest like I always do.  For the moment, this blog will do.  I’m enjoying it a lot 🙂

This prompt, and many more, can be found here.

“What Are Your 5 Guilty Pleasures?”

My five guilty pleasures are:

  • Donuts.  Especially Krispy Kremes.  Oh god, they’re amazing.  And so calorie-laden that you feel guilty before even buying them.  I love them so much!
  • Tumblr.  While this isn’t something you’d usually put into the “guilty pleasure” category, the amount of time I can waste on that site is crazy.  There’s just so much good stuff on there and once you start you can’t get off it!
  • The Sims.  If I played it like a normal person, this wouldn’t be a guilty pleasure at all.  However, I’ve been playing it since I was 12, and have played all the boring storylines out to death.  So now, my sims all have crazy lives.  Twenty kids, random deaths in their family, sudden poorness, strange jobs, random hook ups and affairs.  I feel guilty inflicting it on them…but it’s so entertaining!
  • Snuggling with Toys. When I’m sad, I love cuddling with my old teddy and my new Build-A-Bear.  I guess it takes me back to childhood, and who doesn’t like to be taken back there sometimes?
  • Online Shopping.  It’s the mother of all guilty pleasures for me, as I spent money I shouldn’t be spending on stuff I really don’t need to be buying.  Nothing beats the feeling of the package arriving and it being full of discounted goodness!

What are your guilty pleasures?

This prompt, and many more, can be found here.

“What is Your Favourite Accessory Right Now?”

My favourite accessory at the moment is my Apple Watch.  I ordered it when it was first released and, although it isn’t perfect, I really like it.  I’ve used other smart watches and compared to them, this works a lot smoother and has a lot more features.

s38si-sbwh-sel-201509_GEO_US

There are a few reasons why I really like it (especially compared to the other ones I’ve used).

  • The Size.  The Apple Watch comes in two sizes (basically, his and hers).  I got the smaller one, so it doesn’t look giant and oversized on my wrist.  While the extra screen space would have been nice, I still find the screen usable and, for the most part, accurate.  It is still slightly bigger than your normal wristwatch (though I think that’s probably moreso because of the square shape instead of round) but it’s not anything that would give you strange looks on the street.  The same can’t be said for the previous watches I’ve used.
  • The Fitness Trackers.  This is the main reason why I wear my watch each day without fail.  The watch tracks heart rate, step count, distance walked, how many hours you’ve been standing and calories burnt.  For the most part I’ve found it accurate, aside from a bug I’ve got right now where it isn’t reflecting how long I’ve exercised for properly (though it’s tracking it properly as third-party apps that use the watch reflect it correctly.  Very weird).  I’ve always found the step count accurate, and I think the heart rate is too, although I have no way of knowing for sure.  The thing I really like about the heart rate monitor especially is that it automatically checks every ten minutes or so, and saves it into the “Heath” app, which is great if you have medical conditions (or find out about one later on).  While not 100% accurate, I’m sure it would help doctors to see that kind of stuff.
  • The Alerts.  The main reason anyone considers a smart watch over something like a Fitbit is the alerts that you can get through your phone to the watch.  This was always the downfall of other smartwatches.  It would alert you to basics and that’s it.  The Apple Watch can alert you of anything you want basically (provided the app itself supports WatchOS, and most do these days).  You can turn off what you don’t want, so you don’t get bombarded with stupid notifications you don’t need.  You can read and reply to text messages with either auto replies (that you can change via your phone) or through siri.  You can answer calls.  Yes, you speak into the watch (though I’ve found the speaker isn’t very powerful and can sometimes make hearing the other person difficult).  You can get email notifications.  You can turn off your alarm – no more racing halfway across the house because you woke up before your alarm and left your phone in your room!  I’ve never had any issues with notifications.  To use Apple’s favourite catchline – “it just works”.
  • Bluetooth Connectivity.  I’ve found this especially useful of late after starting a new job and not wanting to have my phone with me.  It has quite a good range, which means I can be several metres away from my phone without it disconnecting, even if the phone is in a different room.  I’m not sure of the exact distance, but I think it might stretch as far as 10 metres, which is pretty good!  It’s also great if your phone is going flat and you need to charge it in a different room but don’t want to miss anything or constantly have to get up and check.

These are my ultimate favourite things, but there are smaller things I love too.  It took me awhile to adjust to the interface, but once you get it down pat it’s fairly straightforward.  I have the Sport model, and the band is comfortable, although a little fiddly to get on in the morning through bleary eyes.  Once it’s on though, it stays in place and I’ve never had it undo.  I originally wanted the green band but wound up getting the white one to match more outfits.  It’s got a few little marks on it, but overall has stayed fairly clean given I’ve worn it every day.  There are about 8 different watch face layout options, which are then customisable.  Since the reason of version 2 of the software, you can chose your own background picture if you want, or you can use one of the preset ones.  There are both analogue and digital faces, and you can also add things like current temperature, moon cycle, sunrise and sunset, different timezones and how you’re tracking with your fitness goals for the day on the watchface if you don’t mind the clutter.  Overall, I’d recommend it if you’re thinking of spending some cash on a new watch or on something like a Fitbit.  It does set you back a little more, but it also gives you a lot more features.  I don’t know that I’d recommend spending big bucks on a more expensive model…I know they look a bit nicer but it is technology and technology isn’t timeless.  This is why I wound up getting the cheaper one.  It does the same job but means I won’t feel obliged to keep using it after it’s well and truly outdated.

And no, I’m not sponsored by Apple.  I wish I was.  I’d have a more blingy watch than a Sports edition!

This prompt, and may more, can be found here.

“When You Are Feeling Blue, What Will Turn That Frown Upside Down?”

When I’m feeling upset, these are a few things that always make me feel a bit better:

  • Have a long, hot bath.  This is always my first point of call.  About a year ago, I rekindled my love of baths and now I try to have them 3-4 times a week in replace of showers.  Initially, I started having baths as my eczema was the worst it had been since I was a kid and soaking in bath oil helped.  I still add the bath oil (as the hot water definitely dries out my skin), but now I have baths for relaxation more than medical reasons.  I’ll sometimes blog or surf Tumblr or listen to music.  Often I’ll read.  There’s just something about the warmth that helps everything seem a little better.
    the-honest-company-bubble-bath
  • Write.  Sometimes the best way to feel better is to let it out, and the best way for me to let it out is to vent onto a word document.  I’ll often start it like I’m writing a letter to the person who’s upset me (if that’s why I’m upset), and then I’ll just let my fingers type whatever crosses my mind.  I average about 1-2 pages, and I find it often helps me to pinpoint why I’m so upset and get my thoughts in order.  I always save the document so I can look back on it later on and realize how far I’ve come.
    typing-on-keyboard
  • Cry.  I’m a big advocate of crying.  Sometimes, you just need to crawl under a blanket and let it all out.  I always feel worse and more stressed if I’m holding in my emotions, and I always feel a lot better after I release it.
    mom-cries
  • Talking.  Similar to writing, sometimes I just need to vent.  I don’t mind showing weaknesses and letting my guard down around certain people.  Those same people are the ones I always want their input about situations in anyway, so it makes sense to explode on them a little.  I think they’re used to it by now!
    BA2B9E Female Friends Having Lunch Together At The Mall
  • Junk Food.  Not an ideal solution but sugary, fatty foods always make bad things seem a little less painful.  Ice cream, donuts, fries and cookie dough is the top of my list.  And chocolate.  Always chocolate.
    junk-food1
  • Music.  If I can find a song that relates or fits my situation, it will be put on repeat over and over until I’m thoroughly sick of it.  There’s nothing quite like an artist putting your pain into words and over a backing track.
    png_man_hearing_music_by_selenator003_by_selenator003-d5mt0kk
  • Go for a Walk.  This is the newest one on my list.  Depending on the weather and what the problem I’m facing is, sometimes fresh air and exercise help to take my mind off the problem, or allow myself time to think the problem through.  There’s nothing quite like the feeling of warm sunshine and a light breeze to lessen the pain!
    strolling country girl

What ways do you make your bad days better?

I found this prompt here, along with heaps of others!

“Write a Letter to a Special Person in Your Life”

This was a letter I wrote awhile ago, in one of my depressed moods.  I wrote it knowing very well the person it was addressed to more-than-likely wouldn’t read or know about it.  It was just to get it off my chest – a coping mechanism I’ve used for several years when my head and heart feel like they’re exploding and overflowing with thoughts.  Things have changed a bit since then, but I felt like this is a fitting response to the prompt.  I might as well put it to some kind of use, even if it was never given to it’s addressee.

Hi,
You drive me crazy, do you know that? Probably not. I can’t stand not seeing you every day. I really can’t stand that we can’t even meet up regularly. I know, you’re busy and you’ve got this grown up job now and everything is coming up Milhouse for you. I hate that I’m once again in this painful situation of missing and hoping for something that probably isn’t there. It crosses my mind almost daily that I should just walk away. Block your number. Delete whatsapp. That would be the sensible MATURE thing to do, right? For all the joy you bring to my life right now, there’s at least an equal amount of disappointment and sadness. Surely that should be reason enough to move on? It isn’t though. Because sometimes you say or do something and suddenly…suddenly it reminds me why I’m in this situation at all. Granted you probably don’t even know you’re doing it. I’d even go so far as to suggest you’re trying your very best not to do anything like that because girls liking you makes you uncomfortable. Oh yeah, I noticed that. I’m not an idiot. I do find it kind of funny though…not haha funny, just…curious. Being on the bigger side myself, I’d give anything for someone to take an interest in me. Even if it’s awkwardly one sided. I just find it curious why you seem to push people who like you away? I’m not saying you should force something that isn’t there, I just…I would have thought your “big person” mentality may still be there somewhere. What would I know about that though? I didn’t know you then. It may sound funny to say, but I wish I did. Firstly, because maybe you’d have given me a shot…a proper shot. But secondly – and more importantly – because then maybe you’d believe I like you for who you are and not just because you’re super cute. Oh, that’s a plus, I’m not denying that, but you’re more than that. Infinitely more. You’re so funny. I could listen to you for hours and not get bored. And you’re cheeky. You’ve got the cutest smile when you do something naughty. And you’re so smart. World-smart, like you’ve experienced everything. You are always (infuriatingly at times) right. For me to admit that, as I’m sure you know, is a massive deal. I don’t like to be wrong. You’re patient, moreso than anyone I know. You know how to listen and how to respond. That is something that can’t be taught, no matter how much schooling or work experience you’ve had. You’re generous. You don’t mind spending money to make people happy. In this world, there aren’t enough people who understand the importance of that. You’re honest. God, guys your age need a lesson or two in that. It’s refreshing to be given a reality check once in awhile. It’s so nice to hear words come from someone else that you’ve been thinking all along instead of white lies to make you feel better. I guess what I’m getting at is, you are amazing on the inside, so who gives a fuck about the outside? I feel like you just assume anyone who likes you now only does so in a physical sense. I can appreciate that, and I’m also sure you have plenty of examples to back it up with. My point is, I’m not one of them.  I’ve gotten to know you pretty damn well and there isn’t a thing I’d change…well, except the uncomfortableness. I hate that we met the way we did though. I mean, I loved working with you and I enjoyed seeing your face every day, but I just feel like if we’d met in different circumstances, maybe things would be different. Do you remember way back at the start when we talked half the night and you bailed on a party to keep talking? Do you remember those times we could hardly catch our breaths from laughter?  Don’t tell me you didn’t feel something at some point. I saw it in your eyes. That’s why I wish we’d met under different circumstances. I know workplace relationships are a bad idea, and I certainly know how you felt about them. I wish we’d met at a party or through mutual friends or even – god forbid – Tinder. Just somewhere that let us be…I don’t know…free to see how things went. Properly. I feel like this is all being said too late. I always hoped deep down you’d say “fuck it” and ask me out anyway but I knew it wasn’t going to happen. You didn’t want to jeopardise your job. I get it. I mean it’s kind of funny now, given how everything turned out, but still. At the time, I get it. Oh I hope I’m not wrong about it all. It’s one thing to know you don’t feel that way now but it’s another thing entirely to know I was wrong all along. I’ve never been good at picking up signals but I know I caught you staring at me more than once and I know I certainly felt something between us. Please don’t say I imagined that.
Anyway, this turned into an essay. I could keep writing forever and still not fully explain everything. I guess the main point of all this is, I love you and I miss you uncontrollably and I just thought you ought to know. Or I guess, that I ought to tell you. Properly. Not someone else getting in your ear and sniggering as they tell you, as I’m sure has happened previously. I’m sorry about that. I should have been honest from the start, so that didn’t happen. It wasn’t fair on either of us. Too little too late as I’m sure this all is, I needed to get it off my chest. Maybe it’s not too late.

I found this prompt, and many more, here.

“Tell Us About Your Most Disappointing Job Interview.”

After going through at least 15 in the past few months with basically all of them leading to a “sorry you’ve been unsuccessful” call, this prompt is one that hits close to home right now.

The most disappointing one was definitely my first one, but not just because it was my first knock-back in five years.  I really wanted the job.  Like really wanted it.  I was currently still employed at my previous work, but hating every minute of it.  I wanted to get out of there.  I had friends working at the place I was interviewing for.  The pay was good, it was supposed to be a lot of fun, the uniform was better.  I had ample experience for the position.

I walked in confident.  Maybe too confident, I don’t know.  They’d asked me to prepare some stuff prior to the meeting, and I’d done that to as high a standard as I could manage, and presented it in the nicest way I could think of.  They were impressed with it, that much I could see.  They were really nice, I felt like the interview went really well.

Towards the end, I found out I’d been interviewing for a different store than I’d applied for.  One much further away.  I didn’t say anything.  I desperately needed to get out of my current employment and I really wanted to work for these guys.  I’d just make it work.  It wouldn’t be ideal but I’d do it and arrange a transfer later on.

I left thinking I’d done really well.  I thought I was as good as hired.  My experience speaks for itself, I thought, and the interview went smoothly.

A week ticked by.  I was starting to worry but it had taken literally months to hear from them after I applied, so I didn’t let myself stress too much.  I shot them an email asking what was happening, and got one back the next day saying they were still sorting things out.  It’s fine, they’ll call, don’t worry, I told myself.  So I kept waiting.  The next week, I got a call.  Freaking finally! I thought.

“Sorry, we were really impressed by your preparation and everything but we don’t know if you’d be right for the store.  We’ll keep your details on file though.”

I couldn’t have been more floored if aliens had dropped out of the sky right that moment.  What?!  How did this happen?!  I was so upset and disappointed.  I’d really wanted it and I thought I’d done well in the interview.  I had the perfect credentials for the job.  How could they say no?

I’d learnt a valuable lesson from it: don’t get your hopes up for things completely out of your control.  After I lost my job shortly after, this lesson would come into practice again and again.  I never let myself get that disappointed again.  Luckily.  If I did, I would have been a mess by the time someone finally offered me something.

Looking back, I think I didn’t get it because I was so rusty at interviews.  I took their niceness for me doing well, instead of politeness.  I probably said a bunch of thing wrong.  I wore the wrong thing.  I probably came off as desperate.  I’m not sure.  I just know that by the time I got to the interview where I was offered a job, I felt like I was very different.  I carried myself differently, answered the questions differently, took my time, dressed much more corporate.  I also understood that for every job that was advertised, roughly 19 other people were going for the same role too.  I didn’t know that going into the first interview.  I knew they’d had a few applicants, sure, but not that many.  It’s certainly a sobering fact to learn.  It doesn’t matter how good you are, there are 20 other people who potentially have more experience than you.  It’s a rough world right now.

-JD

Call Me, Maybe

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “Call Me, Maybe.”
Describe your relationship with your phone. Is it your lifeline, a buzzing nuisance, or something in between?

I love my phone.  I’m beyond addicted to it.  I’m so addicted, in fact, that I carry a spare one around with me in case I forget my everyday one at home.  It’s bad, I know.  After working in telco for five years and it being my job to know phones backwards, it’s definitely rubbed off on me.  Prior to working in telco, I had a pink flip phone that I’d used for five years.  It was reliable, had access to MSN and Facebook and I could text quickly on it (kids today will never understand how much effort it took to type on those phones!).  After starting in telco, I went through an average of 4 phones a year up until about 2 years ago when I slowed it down to between 1-2 a year.  I was obsessed with having the latest features, the coolest brands.  I knew the best way to get them on contracts so it wouldn’t cost me a fortune.

Like most 20-somethings, I’m part of the ironic group of people who use their phone for everything except phone calls.  If it rings, I’ll answer it, but I rarely call anyone.  I hate talking on the phone.  I’d rather take an extra 10 minutes and have the conversation through text message.  It’s not so much I’m addicted to texting, but as an introvert I find it a lot less confronting.  I have time to reply.  I’m not put on the spot.  If I don’t feel like talking, I can reply later.  I’m also one of those people who ignore calls if I’m not in the mood to talk.  Sorry.  I know if I do answer when I’m in one of those moods, I’m no good to talk to anyway.  One word answers and I try to get off as quickly as possible.  I’d rather ignore the call, mentally prepare myself for a conversation, then call back.  It’s nothing personal against whoever is calling.  I just hate phone calls.

I use my phone for games (sometimes), emails, banking, social media, photography, fitness tracking and navigation.  I use it to post blogs, to find quotes on Tumblr, to play music, to read books.  I read a fact somewhere that Gen Y-ers look at their phones an average of 300 times a day.  No way!  I initially thought it was rubbish.  Then I caught myself pulling my phone out of my pocket again and again.  Checking the time, getting distracted my something else, putting it back, remembering, pulling it out again.  I’d check it continuously for texts.  I’d google something.  I’d check my emails.  I’d post something on Instagram or Snapchat.  I started to realize 300 was probably not a high enough number.  Is it any wonder the battery needs to be charged every night?

Yep, it’s official, I’m addicted!

-JD

Modern Families

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “Modern Families.”
If one of your late ancestors were to come back from the dead and join you for dinner, what things about your family would this person find the most shocking?

This is an interesting thought.  I’ve spent a bit of time building my family tree, and I found it really cool.  That being said, family trees don’t go into much detail past names, birth and death dates and maybe a grainy photo if you’re lucky.  This prompt forces you to think beyond that a little.

If any of my ancestors came back, I don’t think they’d be too surprised about anything in my family.  We don’t have any skeletons in the closet, there’s no teenage pregnancies or mixed families.  There’s one divorce that I can think of, no gay people or even inter-racial relationships.  We’re the epitome of unsurprising in this day and age, to the point it’s actually kind of boring.

That being said, I think they’d be extremely surprised about the world we’re growing up in.  Technology is everywhere and taken for granted.  Can you imagine someone from 1900 seeing what we have today?  Giant TVs that can stream basically any movie you want, gadgets in your pocket that allow you to speak to anyone at any time, watches you can control by speaking to it, cars that run on batteries, roadsigns that can change depending on traffic conditions, lights and heaters that can be switched off and on from anywhere in the world with the click of a button, wifi internet that allows you to connect to all the information you could ever need.  The list is endless.  We might laugh at how advanced they assumed we’d be when they were asked “what will it be like in the year 2000?” – we may not have hoverboards and flying cars but we have a lot of other things they couldn’t have even dreamt of.

I think the single biggest thing that would blow their minds would be navigation.  It’s something we all take for granted now, but it’s actually incredible.  You can be basically anywhere on earth, and with the tap of a couple of buttons you can find your way.  You can have a voice telling you where to turn, if you miss your street it can automatically readjust and find another route, you can even use Google Earth to see almost anywhere in detail.  How crazy would that seem to outsiders?  Instead of having to pour over maps and planning your trip in advance, you just do it on the fly, without even thinking about it.  Instead of asking strangers for help if you get lost, you just wait for the gadget to readjust and keep right on going.  To them, it would seem like you literally have the whole world in your pocket.  It would be the coolest, scariest thing in the world…and we don’t even think twice about it!

-JD

#loveme challenge – Day Twenty

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Day 20 – Something You Love to Wear

Ah, this one is definitely my favourite prompt!  I have a giant collection of Converse shoes in all different colours, patterns and designs – the crazier the better!  I have roughly 40 pairs and once I start having a steady income again, it’ll no doubt grow from there.  My favourite pair are my purple hi-top platforms, as they’re not only eye-catching but super comfortable as well.  When I was at my old work, I used to (naughtily) get away with wearing whatever shoes I wanted to (the bottom half of our uniform was jeans so it didn’t look terrible) so I got to make use of my collection.  This new job isn’t gonna be quite as flexible as that unfortunately, so back to weekend-only wear they all go 😦

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-JD